You’ll discover all you need to know about the Bruce protocol stress test using our METs calculator. It’s a non-invasive stress test that’s used to evaluate cardiovascular fitness and aerobic endurance and diagnose cardiac problems. This page also covers the metabolic equivalent of tasks and interpreting treadmill test results.

What is a metabolic equivalent of task (MET)?

One metabolic equivalent (MET) equals 3.5 ml O2 per kg body weight x min. We define it as the quantity of oxygen utilized when sitting at rest. The MET idea is a straightforward, practical, and easy method of representing the energy expenditure of physical activity as a multiple of resting metabolic rate. The energy cost of an activity is calculated by multiplying the activity’s relative oxygen cost (ml O2/kg/min) by 3.5. This page compiles and shows energy expenditure figures in both METS and watts units for various domestic and leisure activities. In addition, the intensity levels (in METS) for various workout regimes are stage by stage compared. Despite its flaws, the MET concept is a valuable tool for describing an individual’s functional capacity or exercise tolerance as determined by progressive exercise testing and defining a repertoire of physical activities. A person can safely participate without exceeding a prescribed intensity level.

What is the Bruce protocol stress test?

The Bruce protocol is a typical cardiology test consisting of repeated three-minute exercise sessions. The treadmill’s gradient and speed are increased at each step to enhance work output, referred to as METS. The Bruce protocol’s first stage is run at 1.7 miles per hour with a 10% incline on treadmill. Stage 2 has a top speed of 2.5 mph and a 12 percent gradient, while Stage 3 has a top speed of 3.4 mph and a 14 percent gradient.

What are good maximum METs values?

Their age and gender greatly influence the maximum number of METs a person may obtain. For example, men’s hearts are more prominent on average than women’s, pushing more blood through the body and giving oxygen to the muscles. Furthermore, the maximum METs naturally peak in the 20s and then drop by 10% every decade after that. Hereditary factors also influence your peak performance. Furthermore, if you exercise at a high altitude, the reduced air density reduces your maximum METs.

Most significantly, your current training state has a significant impact on your maximal METs!

  • Non-trained women have a maximum METs of approximately 8, while non-trained males have a maximum METs of 10.
  • For a 30-year-old woman, a suitable maximum METs value is 14, while for a male, it is 15.
  • Elite athletes may achieve maximum METs of 22 for women and 25 for men (men).

Don’t be concerned if your current maximum METs aren’t ideal. With a solid training regimen, you may quickly raise it. On the other side, don’t expect the highest METs to turn you into the world’s top endurance athlete. Technique and experience account for a large portion of sports performance.

Why is this relevant for me?

After all this discourse, you may wonder why you should worry about METs and peak physical performance. My maximum METs are a little lower than the national average. So, what’s the point? I do not intend to pursue a career as a professional athlete. I’m in a terrific place right now.

I’m sad to tell in such a scenario, but there may be some benefits to increasing your fitness program. According to a 2018 study, cardiorespiratory fitness, as measured by VO2 max and hence max METs, “it has shown to be a strong and independent predictor of all-cause and disease-specific mortality.” A lack of cardiorespiratory fitness has also been related to an increased risk of heart disease and cancer.

The WHO advises “150 to 300 minutes of moderate to vigorous aerobic activity per week for all people” as a guideline for how much you should exercise, emphasizing that “every motion matters.”

How to use the Bruce protocol METs calculator?

We now have all of the information we need to utilize the Bruce protocol METs calculator, thanks to our understanding of the metabolic equivalent of task and the Bruce protocol stress test.

Give your sex and age to the Bruce protocol calculator. Let’s pretend you’re 30 years old and a woman.

Based on the Oakland non-linear calculation, your maximal heart rate is 185.7 bpm.

Insert the time in minutes and seconds it took you to complete the Bruce protocol stress test, for example, 12 minutes and 30 seconds.

Your maximum VO2 and METs calculated to be 50.85 ml/kg/min and 14.53 kcal/kg/min, respectively. For your sex and age, this is a satisfactory outcome. Congratulations!

The table below summarizes the significance of your result concerning the average findings for your gender and age group.

Frequently Aasked Questions

How many stages are in the Bruce protocol?

According to the original Bruce procedure, the patient walks on an uphill treadmill in a graded activity test with electrodes on the chest to monitor. The treadmill’s speed and inclination are raised every 3 minutes. There are seven phases, and only the most physically fit athletes can complete all seven.

What is the Bruce protocol stress test?

The Bruce protocol is a typical cardiology test consisting of repeated three-minute exercise sessions. The treadmill’s gradient and speed are increased at each step to enhance work output, referred to as METS. The Bruce protocol’s first stage is run at 1.7 miles per hour with a 10% incline.