Are you looking for a PSA density calculator? You’ve come to the right place. This blog sheds light on how to calculate PSA levels and prostate volume. Read on!

The prostate

The prostate is a small gland in men that sits below the bladder and wraps around the tube that carries urine out of the body. It helps make seminal fluid, the milky fluid that helps transport sperm. The prostate continues to grow larger with age, which can cause problems like difficulty urinating or difficulties in sexual function. Research has found that some foods may be helpful for preventing or treating conditions related to an enlarged prostate such as the reduced risk for prostate cancer or benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH).

What is PSA?

The prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a protein produced by the prostate gland. It is found in blood, semen, and other body fluids. PSA levels can be measured using a blood test.

In most cases, PSA levels are not high enough to cause concern about cancer; however, they can be elevated for other reasons such as inflammation or infection of the prostate gland. In some people with prostate cancer, PSA levels may also be low because they have very little or no tumor growth at that time.

Even if your PSA level is slightly increased, you will need further testing to determine whether it’s due to an enlarged prostate or cancerous growth on the gland itself.

How to calculate PSA density and its meaning

Doctors measure PSA density by dividing the PSA level in blood by the volume of the prostate gland. The volume of a gland can be determined by digital rectal examination (DRE), ultrasound, or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan.

High PSA density is most likely to be caused by aggressive cancer that has spread beyond your prostate. If you have high PSA density and you are age 55 or older with no signs of other health problems, talk to your doctor about whether you should get an MRI to find out if there is cancer in other parts of your body.

Prostate cancer usually grows slowly and doesn’t cause any symptoms until it has spread beyond just the prostate gland itself. But if it does grow quickly, this means it may not have been caught early enough for treatment before it spreads outside the prostate into nearby tissue and organs such as bones or lymph nodes near them.

Prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men. It occurs more often in African-American men than in white men, and also occurs with greater frequency among Hispanics. The risk of prostate cancer increases with age, especially after age 50, so if you’re a man over 50 and have never been diagnosed with prostate cancer, you should talk to your doctor about getting screened for the disease.

Some research suggests that a diet low in fat and high in fruits and vegetables may reduce your risk of prostate cancer by as much as 30 percent; however, other studies don’t support this finding.

It can be difficult to prevent prostate cancer since so many factors are involved. But including more fruits and vegetables in your diet may help prevent these conditions. Consider trying tomatoes, watermelon, pink grapefruit, guava, papaya, apricots, red cabbage, or leafy greens like spinach and kale.

Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a noncancerous enlargement of the prostate gland that can cause difficulty urinating. BPH occurs in about 50% of men over age 60, and 80% of those over age 85.

Dietary supplements that have been studied for their effects on BPH include lycopene and flavonoids. Lycopene is a carotenoid pigment found in tomatoes, watermelon, pink grapefruit, guava, papaya, and apricots (red fruits). Flavonoids are polyphenolic compounds found in fruits and vegetables—specifically blackberries, blueberries, red grapes, or berries like raspberries

How to use the PSA density calculator

Our calculator calculates the PSA density using the volume of the prostate along with the total value of PSA. So, all you need to do is enter the length, width, and height of the prostate, as well as the PSA value, which will give you the final PSA density.

Conclusion

If you are concerned about your risk of prostate cancer, talk to your doctor. He or she may recommend that you get a PSA test and discuss the benefits and risks of the test with you. Remember that a high PSA level does not mean you have prostate cancer. The decision to take a PSA test should be based on an informed discussion between the patient and his physician, taking into account the patient’s risk factors and preferences.

FAQ

What is the prostate?

The prostate is a small gland in men that sits below the bladder and wraps around the tube that carries urine out of the body.

What is PSA?

The prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a protein produced by the prostate gland. It is found in blood, semen, and other body fluids.

How is PSA measured?

Doctors measure PSA density by dividing the PSA level in blood by the volume of the prostate gland.